IKS Lecture: Hilary Finchum-Sung, "Re-centering Female Narratives through Murmurs and Song"

September 30, 2019
Thursday, November 7, 2019 - 3:55pm to 5:15pm
Hayes Hall 006
핀첨성 cropped.jpg

The Institute for Korean Studies presents:

Hilary Finchum-Sung
Executive Director, Association for Asian Studies
University of Michigan

Title: Re-centering Female Narratives through Murmurs and Song

Flyer: Finchum-Sung Flyer

Abstract: When people gather to share their voices, they both claim a public role and re-center narratives to include their experiences and their perspectives. Such expressivities are key to building and nurturing fluid social relationships. This presentation focuses on the role of heungeulsori (murmuring sound), an individualistic and improvisatory expression of female desire and angst. In Korea, heungeulsori has served as an emotional outlet for women, uttered either in hopes the message could be received or, at least, released onto the air. Here, I examine diverse contexts for the performance of heungeulsori and consider the ways by which performers evoke individual, community and regional identities through use of melodic and narrative tropes. By examining public presentations of a once-private form of female articulation, the presentation touches on the ways by which concepts of genre and related expressivities transform in accordance with societal transformations and the human relationships therein.

Bio: Hilary Vanessa Finchum-Sung (Ph.D. Indiana University) is currently the Executive Director of the Association for Asian Studies. She formally served as Dean of Student Affairs at Seoul National University's College of Music and Associate Professor of Theory and Ethnomusicology in the Department of Korean Music at Seoul National University (2009-2019). In addition, Finchum-Sung formerly taught in the MA in Asia Pacific Studies Program at University of San Francisco and served as an administrator and researcher at UC Berkeley's Institute of East Asian Studies. She is a Korean music specialist with research interests in sustainable practice in traditional Korean music performance, musical genealogies, gender roles and performance, and emotion embodied through sound. In avid pursuit of musicianship, she regularly practices and performs on the two-string spike fiddle, haegeum.

Free and Open to the Public

This event is supported by a U.S. Department of Education Title VI grant to The Ohio State University East Asian Studies Center.

 

 

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